Mills & Mines

C



A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


C mill, Dean CloughRef 15-1228

C. W. S Union Flour Mills, Sowerby BridgeRef 15-464
Walton Street.

Built in 1859.

The mills had their own railway sidings at Sowerby Bridge Station.


Owners and tenants of the mills have included

 

The mills burned down in 1965 and the buildings were demolished shortly afterwards

Cabinet Works, BrighouseRef 15-1082
Mill Lane. The joiner's shop of the Brighouse District Industrial Society Limited was on the first floor of the Abattoir at The Lees around 1900

Calder Bank Mill, EllandRef 15-778
Saddleworth Road.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

Calder Bank Mills, RastrickRef 15-C729
Birds Royd Lane.

The mill is recorded as having 4 storeys at one end and 5 at the other, being 13 windows high, and 8 across, and employing over 300 people.

The little yard/slope to the mill is Snake Hill.

Marsden Brothers, Holden & Company may have been here.

On 29th January 1909, the mill – then occupied by J. Cheetham & Sons Limited – was destroyed by fire which started in the drying room. After the fire, Cheetham's bought the vacant Belle Vue Mills and was soon able to resume production.

In 19??, David Hepworth bought the mill and used it for his businesses Stovit & Hepworth Domestics.

In 1977, the mill was destroyed in a fire described as Brighouse's biggest bonfire and the great Brighouse fire of 1977.

The property was sold to Richard Binks of Mill Royd Mill.

The Hepworth family do still [2015] own the properties on Princess Street, the next yard across

Calder Bridge Mill, BrighouseRef 15-193
Bought by Richard Kershaw for his silk spinning.

It was later used for cotton spinning. In 1873, it was damaged by fire. In 1904, it was occupied by Hardman's and was destroyed by fire

Calder Carpet Works, BrighouseRef 15-1263
Recorded in 1874, when the works were sold at auction to Messrs Swallow of Heckmondwike for £1,200.

Owners and tenants have included

Calder Chemical Works, Sowerby BridgeRef 15-164


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

The site became a scrap yard. The site was cleared in 2001 and is now a housing development

Calder Dale Iron Works, Sowerby BridgeRef 15-463
Walton Street.

In 1890, the works comprised a number of large 2 and 3-storey buildings and covered between 5 and 6 acres.


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

Calder Dale Works, NorlandRef 15-734


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

Calder Dye Works, RastrickRef 15-C730
Birds Royd Lane. Built in 18??


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

The works were served by a reservoir in the grounds of Birds Royd House

Calder Fire Clay Works, EllandRef 15-562
Elland Lane, just below Strangstry Wood.


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

On 24th October 1889, Rowland Holroyd was killed in a roof fall at the works

Calder House Mills, MytholmroydRef 15-381
Occupied by Ratcliffe Brothers Limited when it was damaged by fire on 16th November 1964

Calder Mill, EllandRef 15-C742

Calder Mill, Hebden BridgeRef 15-C750
Stubbing Holme. Aka Co-op Mill. A steam-powered cotton mill built in 1863.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

In 1906, it was affected by the fustian weavers' strike.

It was badly damaged by fire on 3rd November 1964

Calder Mine, SouthowramRef 15-1291

Calder Vale Mill, CornholmeRef 15-1031
Pudsey Road.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

Calder Vale Mills, RastrickRef 15-428
Woollen manufacturing is recorded here in 1867.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

In 1894, Fairburns bought the mill and combined it with Victoria Works, Rastrick

Calder Vale Works, CornholmeRef 15-759
Pudsey Road.


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

Calder Works, EllandRef 15-C743
Aka Castle Mills

Calder Works, Sowerby BridgeRef 15-167
Walker Lane.


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

Calderdale BreweryRef 15-C18
Mearclough, Sowerby Bridge.


Owners and tenants of the brewery have included

 

Calderdale Iron WorksRef 15-1369
Sowerby Bridge.

Established by Thomas Berry & Sons around 1831

Calderside Dye Works, TodmordenRef 15-440

Calderside Mill, Hebden BridgeRef 15-C680
Near Whitely Arches.

Built as a cotton mill in 1824 the building was subsequently converted into a dye works. The 5-storey building was increased by 2 storeys.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

The 300 ft high chimney of 1842 was said to be the tallest in the district

In the 1960s, the mill was demolished and 2 houses built on the site.

[2006] The site is to be cleared and 8 new houses built.

See Whitely Arches, Mytholm

Caldervale Mill, TodmordenRef 15-71

Caledonia Wire MillsRef 15-C601
Charlestown Road, Halifax. Wire-making works of Frederick Smith & Company.

James Royston, Son & Company moved here in 1980.

Yorkshire Plastic Wires moved here from Normanton around 1982.

The building was demolished in 2001/2002. The site is now occupied by various retail outlets

California Works, WalsdenRef 15-1152
Owners and tenants have included

Callis Mill, CharlestownRef 15-C360
Halifax Road, Hebden Bridge.

Aka Charlestown Mill, Roddins Mill.

Originally, a water-powered cotton mill. This was the largest mill in Charlestown.

A woollen mill is recorded in 1786. It was built by Christopher Rawdon and the Rawdon family.

About 1825, the Ashworth family took a lease on the mill.

About 1830, the mill was badly damaged by fire, and lay derelict for many years.

The Rawdons then moved to Liverpool, leaving Mr Sam at Roddins in charge.

In 1839, the Ashworths and James and Christopher Rawdon sold some of the land for the construction of the railway.

In 1862, James Speak is recorded at

Formerly of Callis Mill, Stansfield

In 1861, it was owned by the Lacy family.

John Pearson was here in 1905.

In 1906, the body of writer James Henry Ogden was found here.

There was a fire at the mill on 9th January 1922.

In 1926, it became Cords Limited, owned by Shepherd and Tattersall. The company produced cotton tyre fabric, using a process patented by Mr Shepherd, which was used in the manufacture of tubeless tyres. The business closed in 1971.

See Mr Sam at Roddins

Canal Dye Works, HalifaxRef 15-437
Old Lane / Lee Bank. Built in 18??

The early 19th century water siphon and overflow sump are listed

Canal Kilns, EllandRef 15-769
Halifax Road. Woodside Mills, Elland were next door [1905].


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

Canal Mill, BrighouseRef 15-C520
Built by Joseph Firth.

See Samuel Baines

Canal Mills, EllandRef 15-C5200
Stood along the Calder & Hebble Navigation

Canal Mills, Sowerby BridgeRef 15-C656
Stood at Washer Lane Bottom, between the canal & Wakefield Road.

6-storey mill which was one of the largest mills locally.

It became the headquarters of John Edwards & Sons.

When it was owned by Sir Henry Edwards, he objected to pollution – see Edwards-Wainhouse Feud – and had all the chimneys at the mill demolished except for one short chimney. He installed Juke's Patent device in the boiler house to remove much of the visible carbon from the smoke.


Owners and tenants of the mills have included

 

It was damaged by fire on 20th April 1980.

See Rolleston Edwards

Canal Street Works, TodmordenRef 15-305
Halifax Road.

Aka Lord Brothers' Mill.

The mill was built in the 1840s by John Lord and his sons.

In 1859, the mill was flooded.

There was an explosion on 21st January 1875, when 6 people were killed and other injured. This is still regarded as one of the town's worst industrial disasters.

There were further fires in 1884 and in 1886.

See William Southwell

Canal Wharf Saw Mills, Hebden RoydRef 15-C686
Built in 1851.


Owners and tenants of the mills have included

 

The building was sold in 1987.

The mill was damaged by a disastrous arson attack in 1990. The mill reopened in 1991, and the visitors' centre offered many attractions for the tourist.

The mill closed in 199?.

When production at the mill stopped, it continued as a tourist attraction until it was abandoned.

It has been empty and boarded up since 2003.

In December 2005, planning permission was granted for part of the mill to be demolished and for the remainder to be converted into 32 apartments.

In September 2007, the proposed design – which had been revised for 51 apartments and 75 parking spaces – was turned down by council planning officers who decided that it

would be detrimental to the character and appearance of such a prominent location

and

... because of the design, parking problems, the risk of flooding and noise

On the 1st August 2019, there was a large fire at the derelict mill, which left the building


damaged beyond repair
 

The engine – a horizontal single cylinder steam engine – was undamaged by the fire, and was taken to Gordon Riggs Garden Centre, Walsden

Canal Works, BrighouseRef 15-974


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

Canal Works, HalifaxRef 15-153
Water Lane.


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

Canal Works, Sowerby BridgeRef 15-989
Wakefield Road.


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

Canker Dam Mill, SouthowramRef 15-950


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

Canteen Mill, TodmordenRef 15-72
Lydgate.

About 1830, a weaving shed was built on the site of the Old Canteen Inn, Todmorden. Thomas Hollinrake carried on cotton manufacture here.

In 1860, William Mitchell, cleared the site and built a large room and power weaving shed and warehouse, which became known as Canteen Mill


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

Carlton Electrical Works, HalifaxRef 15-1238
23 Bull Close Lane.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

Carlton Mill: ChimneyRef 15-1253
The 115 ft tall mill chimney at Carlton Mill, Sowerby Bridge was built around 1850.

It is listed.

It is a landmark on Wharf Street

Carlton Mill, Sowerby BridgeRef 15-C717
Wharf Street.

Worsted spinning mill built around 1850 for Thomas Nicholl.

The landmark chimney on Wharf Street is listed.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

It has been converted to apartments

Carlton Works, HalifaxRef 15-1016
The Boulevard.


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

Carr Green Dye Works, RastrickRef 15-70

Carr Mill, TodmordenRef 15-73


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

Carrfield Mill, TodmordenRef 15-102


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

Cartwright's Mill, RawfoldsRef 15-R274
Rawfolds Mill was built by Benjamin Broadley around 1774.

William Cartwright's mill was on the river Spen at Rawfolds, near Liversedge.

On the evening of 11th April 1812, the mill was attacked by a Luddite mob of about 150 men led by George Mellor

Casson's Mill, EllandRef 15-1086
Tom Casson's Mill. Stood in Crown Street, between Portland Street and Commercial Street

See Thomas Casson & Brother and Thomas Casson

Castle Fields Quarry, RastrickRef 15-530


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

Castle Mill, Cragg ValeRef 15-227
On Elphin Brook.

One of the Cragg mills.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

Castle Mills, EllandRef 15-C744
Aka Calder Works, Elland

Castle Quarry, RippondenRef 15-1167
It is now [2010] a builder's yard

Catholes Brick Works, TodmordenRef 15-1032
Lydgate

Causeway Mill, TodmordenRef 15-177

Causey Mill, LangfieldRef 15-858

Causeywood Mill, LangfieldRef 15-C155
Water-powered cotton-spinning mill built by Firth, Howarth & Firth about 1803 on land owned by Samuel Hanson.

Re-built about 1826. The dam also fed Oldroyd Mill. It was converted to steam in 1833.

Owners and tenants have included

It lay empty for some time before it was dismantled [1895] and demolished in the early 1900s

Caxton Printing Works, Hebden BridgeRef 15-1166
Owners and tenants have included

Central Brass Works, HalifaxRef 15-987
Woolshops.


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

Central Brush Works, HalifaxRef 15-671
5 Cheapside and Victoria Street East.


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

Central Clothing Factory, Sowerby BridgeRef 15-1159
Hollings Mill Lane.

Owners and tenants have included

Central Iron Works, BoothtownRef 15-756
Claremount Road.


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

Central Oil Works, HalifaxRef 15-907
17 Harrison Road.


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

Central Pattern Works, HalifaxRef 15-152
Gibbet Hill.


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

Central Works, BrighouseRef 15-964


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

Central Works, Sowerby BridgeRef 15-569
Wharf Street.


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

Centre Mills, Sowerby BridgeRef 15-568
Wharf Street.


Owners and tenants of the mills have included

 

The mill burned down

Century Dye Works, EllandRef 15-C745
Millgate.


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

See George Casson

Century Works, HalifaxRef 15-491
Pellon Lane.


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

The works were disused from April 2007.

In June 2008, there were plans to use the building as an extension of the local Mosque

Chapel Field Foundry, RippondenRef 15-8130
Elland Road.


Owners and tenants of the foundry have included

 

Chapel Field Mill, RippondenRef 15-C741
Elland Road.

Built by the Chapelfield Mill Company in 1852.

Named for a Chapel which preceded St Bartholomew's Church.

Around 1880, a lift shaft was added to the building.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

The building was destroyed by fire on 19th March 1929. The site was cleared.

See Chapel Farm, Ripponden and Robert Holt

Charlestown MillRef 15-397
Aka Callis Mill, Charlestown

Charlestown Mine, HalifaxRef 15-1280
Stone quarry which stood on the north side of Charlestown Road, next to Smith's Wire Works.

Recorded in 1910.

Charlestown Road Brick & Tile Works were adjacent to the south-east.

Owners and tenants have included

Smith's works extended on to the quarry site.

The site is now a retail park

Charlestown New Colliery, HalifaxRef 15-1394
Recorded around 1914

Charlestown Road Brick & Tile Works, HalifaxRef 15-593
Stood on the north side of Charlestown Road.

Recorded in 1910.

Charlestown Mine was adjacent to the north-west

ChimneysRef 15-1182

Chunter's Dye Works, HalifaxRef 15-404
Dean Clough. Recorded on maps produced in 1854

Church Bank Mill, Cragg ValeRef 15-175
Aka Gates End Mill, Cragg Vale, Church End Mill

Built on a site previously known as Pepper Bank (1849/50 map) 

It was destroyed by fire on 16th June 1863


Owners and tenants of the mills have included

 

Pepper Bank Mill [1854] and Church Bank Mill [1894] stood on the same site.

One of the Cragg mills

Cinder Hills Colliery, SouthowramRef 15-C533

Cinderhill Mill, TodmordenRef 15-712
Castle Street, Millwood.

Built in 1804. It was 5-storeys and measured 73 ft by 36 ft.

In 1824, the mill was improved by the installation of a 26 hp steam engine by Peel, Williams & Company of Manchester.


Owners and tenants of the mills have included

 

The Rose & Crown pub stood next to the mill.

On 26th March 1911, a fire at the mill caused £2,000 damage.

The mill was demolished [2011]

Cinderhills Fireclay Works, SiddalRef 15-1066
Established around 1837 by Samuel Halliday.


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

On 12th November 1902, fire caused more than £2,000 worth of damage at the works

Claremount Works, HalifaxRef 15-508
Large building on the hillside looking onto North Bridge.


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

Clarence Mill, HalifaxRef 15-C657
Miall Street / Pellon Lane.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

This was the last worsted spinning mill in Calderdale.

The mill was destroyed by fire on 19th June 2010

Clarence Works, HalifaxRef 15-1018
Aked's Road.


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

Clark Bridge Mills, HalifaxRef 15-C747
Aka Riding Hall. A woollen and worsted mill established in 1785.

It stood at the junction of Bank Bottom and Southowram Bank.

J. & J. Baldwin & Partners and Paton & Baldwin had their business here.

On 19th May 1916, Mr Justice Atkin, sitting at London, ordered Halifax Corporation to pay £600 damages to Paton & Baldwin for damage sustained to its Clark Bridge Mills during the great flood of July 1914.

The building was badly damaged by fire on 4th February 1925.

The mills were demolished in 1980. The gates are still there.

See William Teal

Clarke's Mine, HolmfieldRef 15-1278

Clay House Mills, GreetlandRef 15-89
Rochdale Road.


Owners and tenants of the mills have included

 

There was a fire here on 19th September 1839, and another on 1st January 1965.

The Mill was demolished in the 1950s.

See Ann Dickinson

Clay Pits Mills, HalifaxRef 15-C748
Clay Pits Lane / Spring Hall Lane.


Owners and tenants of the mills have included

 

In 1862, the 150 ft tall chimney was considered dangerous and was demolished brick by brick, on account of the surrounding property

Clay Pits QuarryRef 15-1427
Newspapers of the time reported that, on 21st November 1899, Joseph Hutchinson, from Brighouse, was killed by an explosion at the Quarry owned by Hartley & Kaye.


Question: Does anyone know if this might be a misreading for Hartley & Kaye's Cross Platts Quarry, Southowram?

 

Clegg's Mill, CliftonRef 15-374
Earlier name for Little John Mill, Clifton Common for John Clegg who built the mill in 1785

Clifby Works, OvendenRef 15-26

Cliffe Brewery, WarleyRef 15-C33


Question: Does anyone whether – and how – this relates to the Albion Brewery and the Victoria Brewery?

 

Clifton Bridge Iron Works, BrighouseRef 15-644


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

See The Lodge, Brighouse

Clifton Bridge Mill, BrighouseRef 15-481
Wakefield Road.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

On 3rd January 1934 there was a fire here and 100 workers put out of work

Clifton CollieryRef 15-1139
Coal mine near Camm Lane. Recorded in 1851

On 24th June 1857, Benjamin Micklethwaite was killed in a roof fall at the pit.

By 1862, the pit was taken over by the Low Moor Iron Company.

See Clifton colliery railway

Clifton Edge Mill, BrighouseRef 15-1416
Recorded in 1870, when 8-year-old Harry Soothill was employed at Richard Kershaw's Clifton Edge Mill


Question: Is this the same place as Brooksmouth Mill, Brighouse?

 

Clifton Mill, Bailiff BridgeRef 15-C674
A part of the Firth's Carpets complex on the Clifton side of Clifton Beck. The mill was built on the site of the Bailiff Bridge Toll House and Bailiff Bridge Working Men's Institute.

In 1904, the mill was badly damaged by fire. The mill was extended by J. F. Walsh and partners in the 1920s.

In October 2001, the mill – with its newly installed Axminster and Wilton weaving equipment – was put up for sale after the company had closed. Part of the site is being retained for commercial purposes – called Clifton House – and the rest is to be demolished and/or used for housing.

See A. B. Brook

Clifton New CollieryRef 15-1140
Coal mine. It was subsequently owned by Low Moor Iron Company.

Later became Ox Pits.

See Clifton colliery railway

Clifton Vale Print Works, BrighouseRef 15-703


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

Clock Face Quarry, BarkislandRef 15-1179
Saddleworth Road.

Owners and tenants have included

Two newspaper notices on 13th August 1864 announced

Sale by Auction on 24th August at Clock Face Quarry and St Michael's Mount, near Barkisland. The whole of the Quarry Equipment and Draught Horses, etc., for Messrs. Jas. Walker & Sons (in consequence of the Dissolution of Partnership) 

and

The Clock Face Stone Quarry will in future be carried on by Mr John Walker of St Michael's Mount, near Barkisland

Clock Hall Quarry, LightcliffeRef 15-1348

Owners and tenants have included

  • Joseph Aspinall [1896]

Clog Iron Works, WalsdenRef 15-1033
Alma Street

Clog Sole Quarry, BrighouseRef 15-7
Slead Syke.

In 1970, Halifax Corporation Water Committee paid £100 compensation for damage caused to the quarry by water leaking from the Council water supply

Clough Brewery, MixendenRef 15-980


Owners and tenants of the brewery have included

 

Clough Head Mine, TodmordenRef 15-416
Sharneyford. 19th century coal mine and brick works owned by Thomas Temperley.

See Temperley & Son Limited

Clough Hole Mill, TodmordenRef 15-860
On Rodwell Clough. Carding mill. Built 1805. It is now a private house

Clough Mill, Hebden BridgeRef 15-867
Hebden Bridge Lanes.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

Clough Mill, MidgleyRef 15-4
Worsted mill built in 1838.

It was later used to manufacture velvet and cotton.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

Clough Mill, RippondenRef 15-50
In 1792, Richard Learoyd bought a fulling mill here and used it for cotton spinning. His son, Joah, took over business at the mill in 1806. He was joined by his brother, James

Clough Mill, Sowerby BridgeRef 15-282
Gratrix Lane.

The Clough Mill Company Limited was registered in April 1873.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

The mill was demolished in 19??. Housing now stands on the site.

See Hand Carr Mill, Luddendenfoot

Clough Mill, WalsdenRef 15-C460
3-storey cotton-carding and spinning mill driven by a waterwheel. It was built in 1786 by John Fielden on his land at Clough Farm. This was the first water-powered cotton-mill in Todmorden.

The mill was then used by his new partnership, Fielden & Travis, both partners living in houses attached to the mill.

William Fielden and his brothers were here [from 1818].

Around 1835, a 135-foot tall chimney was added. This was demolished in 1895.

Rooms at the mill were rented out to other manufacturers, including John Lord and his sons, and James Fielden.

Because of the Cotton Famine, the mill was quiet between 1865 and 1868, and was then was run by William Dugdale.


Subsequent owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

In 1879, the mill was bought by the Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway Company.

On 3rd November 1892, there was a fire at the mill.

It is now a private house.

See Joseph Travis

Clough Mills, Stone ChairRef 15-32
Halifax Road. Woollen mill built in the late 1890s.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

In 1969, the mill closed.

In 1970, it was taken over by Thomas's Limited (Petcraft).

From 1976, it was used by Decosol.

In 2005, there were plans to convert the building into luxury flats.

The mill was badly damaged by fire on 22nd February 2005 and had to be demolished. The site was redeveloped and is currently [2009] a Volkswagen showroom

Clough Works, Sowerby BridgeRef 15-693
Bolton Brow.


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

Cloughfoot Coal Mine, TodmordenRef 15-C232

Cloughfoot Mill, TodmordenRef 15-365
Aka Owler Carr Mill, Todmorden

Co-op Mill, Hebden BridgeRef 15-260
A popular name for Calder Mill when it was owned by Robertshaw & Company

Coates Pit, HartsheadRef 15-1136
Coal mine in the Kirklees Estate. Recorded in 1884

Cockcroft Mill, RippondenRef 15-409
Aka Bogden Mill, Rishworth

Cockden Mill, StansfieldRef 15-75
Built around 1797 by Abraham Barker.

In 1805, Barker was declared bankrupt and sold the mill.

Hiram Hay took over the mill who used it until 1808

Cocker's Mill, EllandRef 15-470
After the Methodist Southgate Reformers split up in 1871, services were held at Cocker's Warehouse, Briggate, Elland before the Temperance Methodist Chapel, Elland was opened in 1876.

Subsequently occupied by Eli Garnett & Son Limited.

The mill was badly damaged by fire in 19?? and demolished shortly afterwards

Cockhill Farm Colliery, ShelfRef 15-C503
Coal mining and stone quarrying company owned by M. Bottomley & Son [1880]

Cockroft's Silk Mill, RastrickRef 15-1421
Birds Royd Lane.


Question: Does anyone know the name of the mill?

 

Owners and tenants have included

Cold Arbour Coal Pit, BoothtownRef 15-1025
Run by the Stocks family in the late 18th / early 19th century.

In 1810, Michael Stocks was said to have encroached on the coal of Samuel Holdsworth and Captain John Bower, and sold the coal for his own benefit. The 3 men were in partnership, but Stocks also worked Cold Arbour Coal Pit on his own. In 1815, Stocks was charged with wilful and corrupt perjury at the 1810 trial, but he was acquitted.

See Cold Harbour, Pule Hill

Cold Harbour Mine, BoothtownRef 15-1274
19th century coal mine beneath Swales Moor

Coley MillRef 15-488
The corn mill is recorded in 1562 when local tenants were granted permission to take their corn to the mill instead of Rastrick Mill as the Lord of the Manor of Brighouse required.

In the 19th century, the building was put to other uses. It fell into a state of disrepair and was demolished in the 1940s. T' Wheel Hoile pub stood nearby.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

Colne Bridge MillRef 15-450
A cotton mill owned by Thomas Atkinson.

On 14th February 1818, a group of children working the night shift, were inside when fire broke out. 9 children survived, but 17 young girls died.

The mill was rebuilt and operated for a further 100 years, under the ownership of the Haigh family.

Commercial Iron & Brass Foundry, BrighouseRef 15-1193
Established in Park Row, Brighouse in 1828.

The business was bought by Joseph Blakeborough in 1866 to establish J. Blakeborough & Sons Limited

Commercial Mills, EllandRef 15-690
Between Southgate and Huddersfield Road. 6-storey building.


Owners and tenants of the mills have included

 

The mills were demolished when much of Elland was redeveloped in the 1960s. Flats were built on the site

Commercial Mills, HalifaxRef 15-673
Commercial Road.


Owners and tenants have included

 

Commercial Mills, RippondenRef 15-51
Built in 1855 by the Ripponden Commercial Company on the site of Hollings Mill.

The new mill opened on 3rd January 1857. It cost £12,027 to build.

A new, larger mill was begun in 1861. This took 3 years to build and cost £28,313.

At this time, the business was affected by the Cotton Famine.

It was described as

A spacious 6-storeyed building... run on the co-operative principle

On 27th February 1880, the Mill - described as being 32 yards long and 15½ and a half yards wide – was completely destroyed by fire.

In 1896, the Ripponden Commercial Company installed an engine at the Mills with the specifications


Twin beam McNaught compound engine

1600 hp

Corliss HP inlet, piston valves exhaust; slide valves LP

42½ rpm

Gear drive

Tattersall design. Beams 10 tons each, 21'4½" long.

The Mill closed in February 1961 [?].

Contributor Geoffrey Siddall says

I recall that this mill was very well founded. It was the only one I knew without a central engine or rope race. It had a turbine generator, which was a neat arrangement, giving power to each shed. The voltage I don't know, but I recall that they installed a special transformer when I was in Ripponden, so that they did not have to use the full power, and could tap into the mains to run one or more of the sheds

See Commercial Mill Company

Common Wood Quarry, HipperholmeRef 15-1078
Recorded in 1868

Company's Mill, West ValeRef 15-1264
Stainland Road. On 29th October 1873, the mill burned down when a fire broke out as workmen were examining the gearing in the top room. Very little of the mill was saved

Condima Textile Works, HalifaxRef 15-456
Damask Street. Designed by J. F. Walsh [1896]

Condima Works, HalifaxRef 15-1013
Lewis Street.


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

Conway Stone QuarriesRef 15-C408
A division of Brooke's Limited which quarried in several parts of Wales. Around 1913, it became the North Wales Granite Company Limited

Coolham Drift Mine, TodmordenRef 15-C235
About 1800, brothers John and Reuben Haigh, and their father John Haigh, began to develop coal measures under Foul Clough on Inchfield Moor and continued to work these until 1823.

When the mine was exhausted, the brothers made a new entrance to the coal pit at Coolham.

The Haigh family worked these measures continuously until the 1890s.

The remains of the drift mine can still be seen

Cooper Bridge Sewage WorksRef 15-C732
Opened in June 1900 for Brighouse Corporation. Stone from the demolished Rising Sun Inn at Bridge End was used to built the boundary wall at the works

Cooper House Mills, LuddendenfootRef 15-62
6-storey cotton mill on the north bank of the Calder.

Stood next to Brick Mill.

Built in 1832.

The mill was rebuilt by Whitworths in 1862 and they built Wood Bottom Dye Works at the same time.


Owners and tenants of the mills have included

 

The 6-storey mills were damaged by fire on 13th July 1903 - in March 1903, it was decided to rebuild the mill – and on 20th February 1930.

See Mary Kelly and Luddendenfoot Gas Supplies

Co-operative Mills, BradshawRef 15-C685
Aka Tetley's Mill. Worsted spinning mills. 6 or 7 storeys high.

The mill was opened in 1855 to provide employment for the villagers of Bradshaw after local coal mines had closed down.

John Lassey, donated land and villagers raised £7,000.


Owners and tenants of the mills have included

 

and finally taken over by Lister's of Manningham Mills, Bradford.

The mills closed in 1967

Copley Chemical WorksRef 15-573
Stood between Wakefield Road and the Canal at Copley. Recorded in 1907

Copley Gas WorksRef 15-845
This provided a gas supply for the resident's of Copley Model Village

Copley millRef 15-C5830
Woollen mills at Copley. The Swaine family owned the mill until 1808.

The mill was bought by Jonathan Akroyd in 1840, and rebuilt in 1847.

Akroyd's were here on 17th August 1856 when a girl and a young man were killed at the mill.

On 26th May 1893, a new syndicate at Copley Mills – comprising J. Hoyle, T. Hoyle, M. Fearnley, and B. Firth - decided to retain the name James Akroyd & Sons

From 1932 to 1960, the mills were operated by worsted spinners, Thomas Hoyle & Sons Limited.

In 1960, Hoyle's was bought by the Lancashire and Yorkshire Tulketh Group.

The mills closed in 1968 and were demolished in 1975. A council housing estate was built on the site.

See Copley Mills Brass Band, Copley Model Village, William Heaton and William Brown Holgate

Copley Sewage PlantRef 15-825
Opened 28th May 1936

Copperas House Dye Works, WalsdenRef 15-761


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

Copperas House Mill, WalsdenRef 15-104
Copperas House.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

Copperas Works, SiddalRef 15-C691

Copy Pit Colliery, TodmordenRef 15-C264
Windy Bridge

Cornaro Works, Hove EdgeRef 15-1017


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

Cornholme Mills, TodmordenRef 15-76

See Cornholme Mills Company Limited

Cornholme Reed WorksRef 15-1314
See Law Street Works, Cornholme

Corona Chimney, Dean CloughRef 15-1249
A 381 ft high, octagonal, stone chimney with a brick lining. Dated 1857.

The Northampton Mercury [Saturday, 9th January 1858] reported


Messrs Crossley of Halifax are just completing a new chimney connexion with their works at Dean Clough which will be of extraordinary dimensions and weight and will outstrip every other that has been built, even in Lancashire. Although placed in a valley it has attained a level with the summit of Beacon Hill. Its height is 127 yards and the width at the bottom being 10 yards. The weight of bricks and stone used is estimated at 9,685 tons
 

The inside is lined with firebricks supplied by Jonathan Brier, and the outside is stone from the Northowram Quarries.

There is a moulded cornice surmounted by a corona of pointed cast-iron plates.

When the chimney was completed, the builders and steeplejacks held a party at the top.

There is its twin chimney at Holmfield Mills

Coronation Works, BrighouseRef 15-995
Armytage Road. Built in 1966 for the Halifax Rack & Screw Cutting Company Limited when they moved from Coronation Works, Ovenden

Coronation Works, OvendenRef 15-993
Foundry Street. In 1953, Binns & Berry split off their rack and screw cutting operations and bought this factory to establish the Halifax Rack & Screw Cutting Company Limited

Corporation Mill: ChimneyRef 15-1254
The 19th century 98 ft high chimney at Corporation Mill, Sowerby Bridge is listed. It is octagonal with bands at the top

Corporation Mill, Sowerby BridgeRef 15-C635
Built in 1875 by William Morris & Sons Limited. Recorded in 1897.

In 1971, William Morris & Sons moved production here from Stansfield Mills, Triangle.

The chimney is listed.

The mill closed for a time in 1979.


Subsequent owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

It is now known as Joel House

Corporation Street Saw Mills, HalifaxRef 15-877


Owners and tenants of the mills have included

 

Cote Hill Bobbin MillRef 15-C522
Bobbin-manufacturer established in 1798.

The mill was 3 storeys high, and about 40 yards in length.

Owners and tenants have included

On 30th April 1867, the mill was destroyed by fire when it was occupied by A. Munday

Cote Hill Quarry, WarleyRef 15-1356

Owners and tenants have included

Cowbridge Mill, TodmordenRef 15-77
Aka Cowside Mill, Cowbrigg Mill, and Underbank Mill

Stood on Jumble Hole Clough.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

By 1908, Pickles left the Mill, and the looms were moved to Eastwood Shed

The mill was demolished in the 1930s.

The dam was preserved to drive a private electricity supply.

See Cow Bridge, Todmorden

Cowside Mill, TodmordenRef 15-273
Aka Cowbridge Mill, Todmorden

Cragg Mill, Cragg ValeRef 15-229
On Elphin Brook.

One of the Cragg mills.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

Cragg MillsRef 15-872
From the 18th century, the mills at Cragg Vale and Mytholmroyd – and the mill owners – were infamous for their exploitation of child labour.

Notorious amongst these were Castle Mill, Cragg Vale, Church Bank Mill, Cragg Vale, G. & I. Hinchliffe, New Mill, Cragg Vale, Pepper Bank Mill, Cragg Vale, Turvin Mill, Cragg Vale, Vale Mill, Cragg Vale, Victoria Mills, Cragg Vale, Walker & Edmondson, Withens Brook, The Greenwood family of Cragg Vale and The Hinchliffe family of Cragg Vale

Cranbrook Mills, Norwood GreenRef 15-C751
Station Road

Craven Edge Mills, HalifaxRef 15-C749
Hopwood Lane / Back Clarendon Place.


Owners and tenants of the mills have included

 

Crescent Mill, TodmordenRef 15-1319
Aka Hall Ing Mill. Tinplate works.

Owners and tenants have included

In 1873, the Whiteheads sold the mill to Fielden Brothers but they continued to occupy the property

Crimsworth Dye Works, Hebden BridgeRef 15-C574
Midgehole. Opened 18??.


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

Closed September 1958.

See Crossley Head

The Crispit Factory, HalifaxRef 15-1062
Causeway Head, Burnley Road.


Owners and tenants of the factory have included

 

Criterion Works, HalifaxRef 15-618
Lister Lane.


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

Croft Mill, Hebden RoydRef 15-136


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

On 7th February 1922, the mill was gutted in a fire.

It has been converted into offices

Croft Mill, TodmordenRef 15-334
Halifax Road. Occupied by the Cockcroft family – see Henry Cockcroft.

The mill was demolished in 2005

Croft Mill, West ValeRef 15-1242
Rochdale Road. 4-storey mill.

It has been converted into apartments

Croft Mills, HalifaxRef 15-594
Gaol Lane.


Owners and tenants of the mills have included

 

The mill was damaged by fire on 22nd April 1853. Recorded in 1907

Croft Pit, HartsheadRef 15-1333
Coal mine. Recorded in 1925, when Robert Albert Croft murdered Nelson Worthington here

Cromwell Bottom Delph, SouthowramRef 15-1413
Stone quarry. Now disused.

See Cromwell Quarries, Southowram

Cromwell Quarries, SouthowramRef 15-1414
A number of sites in the land between Church Lane, Southowram and Cromwell Bottom.

See Cromwell Bottom Delph Southowram, Cromwell Wood Quarry Southowram and S. Marshall & Sons Limited

Cromwell Wood Quarry, SouthowramRef 15-1055


Owners and tenants of the quarry have included

 

See Cromwell Quarries, Southowram

Cross Hill Mills, HalifaxRef 15-517
Cross Hills, Halifax.


Owners and tenants of the mills have included

 

Cross Hills Iron Foundry, HalifaxRef 15-1404
Recorded in 1829 & 1835, when James Oates was here

Cross Lee Mill, StansfieldRef 15-850
Built in 1804.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

In 1811, the mill operated 648 spindles

Cross Mill, EllandRef 15-766
James Street.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

Cross Mills, HalifaxRef 15-1174
Gaol Lane.

Owners and tenants have included

Cross Platts Quarry, SouthowramRef 15-738
Halfpenny Can Lane.


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

The quarry is now [2005] filled in.

See Mansley's Quarries

Crossfield's Mill, LuddendenfootRef 15-1203
Another name for Denholme Mills, Luddendenfoot when it was occupied by J. W. Crossfield [1911]

Crossley Mill, EllandRef 15-1212
A popular name for Broad Lea Mill, Elland when it was owned/occupied by W. & J. E. Crossley [1915]

Crossley Mill, Hebden BridgeRef 15-137
New Road. Spinning and weaving mill built around 1819/1822 by John Crossley of the Crossley family of Hebden Bridge.

It was possibly the largest mill in the Calder Valley. The mill was originally 5 storeys plus an attic, but, in the 1870s, the mill was reduced to a one-storey weaving shed.

In late 1917, the Crossleys retired from the business and the mill closed.

In 1906, it was occupied by Richard Thomas & Sons and was affected by the fustian weavers' strike.

The mill was run by Richard Thomas & Sons until the late 1940s, then Parker Bros Limited, until late 1950s / early 1960s when it was closed under a government concentration scheme for the cotton industry.

On 15th December 1964, the mill was occupied by Thomas Ratcliffe & Company when it was destroyed by fire.

All that remains of the mill is the truncated chimney around which is built a nursery

Crossley's Mill, WalsdenRef 15-C659
Hollins Road

Crow Carr Ings Mill, TodmordenRef 15-78
Vale Street. Aka the Joint Stock Weaving Shed. Built as a weaving shed by Lord Brothers who loaned the looms to other weavers.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

Crow Nest Works, Hebden BridgeRef 15-259
Station Road. Recorded in 1905. The gas works were completed in 1912. Hebden Bridge Gas Company was here

Crown Brewery, NorthowramRef 15-1008
Bradford Road. Brewers established by John Eastwood in 1876. In 1890, the business was acquired by Bentley's Yorkshire Breweries Limited.

The Brewery closed in 1900.

It became the Crown Works, Northowram.

The mill was demolished after a fire in 19??.

A furniture and carpet store now stands on the site [1990s, 2011].

The Brewery is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs

See Friendly, Catherine Slack and Reuben Eastwood

Crown House, HalifaxRef 15-1079
Mile Cross Road

Crown Steam Printing Works, HalifaxRef 15-672
Weymouth Street. 4-storey mill.


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

Crown Umbrella Works, HalifaxRef 15-944
10 Weymouth Street.


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

Crown Wire Works, BrighouseRef 15-966


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

Crown Works, BoothtownRef 15-992
Grantham Road.

Built by A. Earnshaw & Sons


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

See Godley Ironworks

Crown Works, HalifaxRef 15-1332
Weymouth Street / Culver Street, Halifax.

Owners and tenants have included

Crown Works, HalifaxRef 15-632
Hopwood Lane. Built in 1874 by Josiah Wade for production of his Arab printing machine

Crown Works, Hebden BridgeRef 15-510
Foster Mill. Alongside Hebden Water. In 1907, it is shown as an iron works.


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

Crown Works, NorthowramRef 15-1009
When the Crown Brewery closed in 1900, the premises became the Crown Works.


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

Crowtrees Mill, RastrickRef 15-C648
Crowtrees Lane. Joseph Clay and J. T. Clay & Sons Limited manufactured worsted cloth here from the 19th century until the business closed in 1934.

The mill was then used by W. H. Sladdin & Sons Limited.

It was demolished in 1976. The site was neglected for many years

Crowtrees Quarry, RastrickRef 15-683


Owners and tenants of the quarry have included

 

Cuckoo Steps Mill, Hebden BridgeRef 15-794
Bridge Lanes. 3-storey mill.

Now 2 private dwellings.

See Cuckoo Steps, Hebden Bridge

Cullingworth's Mill, BrighouseRef 15-C619
Mill Royd Mill was used by Hy. Cullingworth & Sons Limited, wool merchants, until 2001



© Malcolm Bull 2021
Revised 15:02 / 1st April 2021 / 132998

Page Ref: M408_C

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